Even to this day, there are many marine creatures that are still unidentified or have been hiding from us, and some are rarely seen.

I’m sure you’ll freak out if you encounter one of them in the deep. Like diver Ryan Carpenter and his diver colleagues who encountered tubular creature while exploring waters off Ticao Island in the Philippines.

Ryan Carpenter said, “No one in our party could identify it (even the divemaster hadn’t seen one before), so we turned to the Internet for help.”

pyro 2

These creepy, feathery, glow-in-the-dark creatures are actually pyrosomes.

pro_huffposthiThey are elusive and totally trippy sea creature seldom seen in real life. Marine biologist Rebecca Helm calls them the unicorns of the ocean.

“Pyrosomes is a colony of hundreds to thousands of individuals called zooids, cloned from one egg and bound together in a cylindrical tunicate looking like a worm creature.”

ssiebert_pyrosome
Photo: deepseanews
The colony of purplish-blue gummy worm look is the effect of a “gelatinous tunic” that binds the zooids together.
171
Photo: eolspecies.lifedesks

The translucent tube it forms is hollow, closed on one end and open on the other, and they are also bioluminescent and can produce a blue-green biochemical light, which glows in the dark.

“Pyrosomes are filter feeders that use the pores, or individual zooids, on its outer surface to eat microscopic plankton. Each pore sucks in sea water, filters the unwanted stuff through its pharyngeal basket, and flushes the water out through its center hole. These actions also thrust the colony through the water.”

pyrosome-1
Photo: oceangate
Pyrosomes can grow up to 60 feet long with a diameter that can fit an adult human inside.
pyrosomes
Photo: epicadamwildlife.com

These delicate and fluffy creatures as one diver describe it like “an exquisitely soft feather boa” are one of the most mysterious glowing creatures of the sea.

Watch the video:

Here’s an explanation about pyrosomes:

The world is really full of amazing things. Share this post and let others know the beauty of pyrosomes.

Via: Huffingtonpost