Cyclops are one of the scariest creature ever mentioned in Greek mythology. Unfortunately, in real life, this is a deformity called Cyclopia. It is one of the rarest forms of birth defects wherein a baby is born with one or conjoined eyes on the mid-forehead and sometimes the nose and mouth are often not working or worst none.

Sadly, because of these missing parts, babies born with cyclopia can’t breathe outside the womb. What’s more heartbreaking is, there’s nothing you can do, but watch them die unless they’re stillborn upon delivery.

On July 26, 2012, Sean McCaffery, a Peace Corps volunteer in Cameroon posted photos of a cycloptic baby born in Cameroon on his personal blog.
Photo: pcafricanadventure.blogspot.jp

The image went viral among social media sites around the world.

According to him, he was visiting a local hospital when a nurse called him and saw a towel wrapped into something in a pan. Sean presumed it was a newborn baby.
Photo: pcafricanadventure.blogspot.jp
Sean was right, however, when the nurse pulled off the towel, he said, “it was as if the entire reality of Africa came crashing down upon my shoulders.”
Photo: pcafricanadventure.blogspot.jp

“The baby had no mouth, no nose, and one severely deformed eye with two pupils. The nurse continued to pull away the towel, and at first, I was relieved. The torso, arms, and little hands seemed completely normal. But the nurse continued, and then pointed to the genital area of the baby, where I saw the child had both sets of genitalia and, according to the nurse, no anus,” he said.

Sean was stunned when suddenly the baby moved, it was still alive and it began to twitch its arms and kicked its legs. Unfortunately, because the baby doesn’t have a nose and mouth to breathe, all they could do is stood there, watch and wait for the baby to suffocate and succumb.

Photo: pcafricanadventure.blogspot.jp

Sean asked about the mother, who is fine and lives far away from the hospital and there’s a huge possibility that she ingested some kind of toxic plant or chemical unknowingly.He felt like being hit by a sledgehammer and sensed the deepest pain of a mother after seeing the child. He said:

He felt like being hit by a sledgehammer and sensed the deepest pain of a mother after seeing the child.

He said: “The mother carried and expected and hoped, for this child for nine months. Nine months. American’s can’t wait nine months for anything. We can’t even wait a few months to see the baby when it’s still in the womb. We criticize Africans for having no sense of delayed gratification, but we are absolutely the biggest hypocrites when we do that. Yet, our desire to see the baby isn’t all that selfish. If the equipment, such as a sonogram, had been available in the hospital, it is likely that the child’s deformities would have been seen early on, and that the mother never would have had to carry it to term. She and her family would have been spared the tremendous emotional shock, disappointment, and shame.”

Surprisingly, before Sean wrote his experience with the cyclops baby, in 2006, a cyclopic baby was born in India and managed to survive for one month. In 2011, another deformed baby was also born in India, but in spite of having a mouth to breathe, it only last for one day.

Surprisingly, before Sean wrote his experience with the cyclops baby, in 2006, a cyclopic baby was born in India and managed to survive for one month. In 2011, another deformed baby was also born in India, but in spite of having a mouth to breathe, it only last for one day.

H/T: rocketnews24