A woman was left with a horrific huge gaping hole in her nose after using an alternative treatment called ‘black salve’ in hope to cure her skin cancer, but it was the biggest mistake she has ever made.

A tiny red spot appeared on her nose and forehead, knowing it is cancer she opted to use a low-cost treatment, the black salve.

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Black salve is a corrosive agent which burns and destroys skin tissue and leaves behind a thick, black scar called an eschar.

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It was commonly used in the early 1900s on moles and scars but nowadays many use it as an alternative skin cancer treatment. However, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has listed it as a ‘fake cancer treatment’ and is currently trying to ban it.

Within few days of applying the ointment, a black green scabs started to appear on her nose and forehead.

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The salve ate away her skin and shockingly left a gaping crater in her nose.

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Three weeks after applying the salve, the eschar has fallen off her nose, leaving her with a severe hole, too severe that she could draw air through it.

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She said:

To put it bluntly, there is no skin left under the eschar to regenerate NEW SKIN outward from the center of the eschar pit???!!

It’s going to be an open PIT, exposing my nasal cartilage and nasal passages to the WORLD!!! What do I do now?

Yes, I have had the ‘Holy ****, what have I done??!! thought…) I’m past it, because what’s done is done. I have to move forward now.

Understandably, as you can imagine, I am sickened and freaked out by my personal revelation tonight – that the salve went completely through my nose down to my nasal passages.

The unnamed woman was forced to have major reconstructive surgery to repair her damaged nose.

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After her disastrous ordeal, she shared her story through a video on the World’s Greatest Medical YouTube channel which has already garnered more than three-and-a-half million views. However, it is not clear if the patient’s cancer remains or if it was removed.

Meanwhile, Dr Erin McMeniman, a dermatologist in Brisbane told Daily Mail:

“I think black salve is used a lot more commonly than we realise. Patients are often quite secretive about where they get it from, but dermatologists often end up seeing cases where there are major complications. Most commonly the tumour is not adequately treated and then 12 months later it’s still growing beneath the scar the cancema [black salve] has produced.”